Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Qur'an - "a new literary form"


Moliere -not  inventor of  the comedie-ballet  (that was Allah)

In his literary study of the Qur'an, The Qur'an's Challenge: A Literary & Linguistic Miracle, Hamza Tzortzis of the Islamic Education and Research Academy (iERA) makes the following incredible claim.


The development of an entirely new literary form is beyond the scope of the natural capacity of any human author, hence a Divine entity, Allah, is the only sufficient comprehensive explanation. 


This claim is one used by Muslims the world over to convince themselves and putative converts of the miraculous -and thus divine - nature of the their holy text. It is, indeed, one of the more important claims used by dawah (evangelical) operatives in their bid to convert Westerners to Islam.

And yet the claim is so ridiculous as to be beyond parody.

Why?

Because were it the case that the proof of the Qur'an's divine origin lay in its "entirely" novel literary form*, then we would, by extension, have to credit Allah with the invention of all other literary forms - for they too were once "entirely new" and thus beyond the scope of the natural capacity blah blah blah....

There can thus be no human inventor of poetry, prose or drama - nor any of its myriad forms. Allah must have come up with them all. Period. Nor in the future can there be any literary innovation without divine intervention. Is this really what we are being asked to believe? Is this the case for the other arts, too? Is it impossible that Impressionism or Cubism or Opera came from a mere human mind?
What a very prosaic, uninspiring and ultimately dispiriting view of the world. 

I wonder, do those who blindly accept the lies and moronic claims of charlatans like those at iERA never sit and think for a moment what they are being asked to believe?

As Moliere once said: People can be induced to swallow anything...What a pity that those who are responsible for such shameful inducements can no longer be held up to ridicule by the man who wrote, inter alia, that (in)famous satire of religious hypocrisy, Tartuffe.


* the so-called "entirely novel literary form" consists, in essence, of being less restricted by the rules of poetic composition extant at the time - or free verse, if you will. The claims to uniqueness and indeed greatness have been examined here. The difficulties inherent in Qur'anic literary criticism are examined here.


13 comments:

  1. Speak Arabic my friend?
    No - of course you don't.
    So how do you hope to make any kind of sound judgement on the literary merits of the Qur'an?
    Muslims know what is right - as you will discover.

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    1. have you read the bible?

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    2. Yes - but the point here is the value of criticism from the position of ignorance (Spinoza's)

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    3. The argument presented by Spinoza is INDEPENDENT of language.

      How sad you couldn't even figure that out? It seems the "you need to be an expert in ancient arabic" copout has become a knee jerk reaction anytime Muslims see a skeptic critique the Qur'an.

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    4. The biggest problem is the 'logic' of the Quran.

      Even if none can produce a Sura like it that doesnt mean it's a miracle

      No one can run the 100m like Usain Bolt can.

      Does that mean his performace was a mircale?

      The Quran's challenge is nothing but subjective nonesense..

      "My girlfreind is ther prettiest girl in the world, and if she isnt, then bring me a girl like her!"

      Sorry, but i'd expect the logic of the creator of the universe to be above that of petty playground arguments.

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    5. "My girlfreind is ther prettiest girl in the world, and if she isnt, then bring me a girl like her!"

      Thank you sir/madame, made my day lol. I was trying to find a witty response to the usual bring something like it and you just summed it up perfectly. Clear and too the point on how much nonsense this whole argument is.

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  2. I agree that the Qur'an has literary merit. I don't speak Arabic, but on reading it in the original language, one does sense a rhythm to the text. And yes, there is rhyming and alliteration. But how does that imply that it is from God?

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. You emailed me? If so, i didnt receive it. What's your email, or maybe try again?

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    2. Sorry the comment was directed at Spinoza

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  4. pfffff.... learn some Arabic first and read the Quran.

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  5. ah...will that help to counter the arguments above then?

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  6. I am a Christian who has read most of the Bible and the Qur'an. However, I do not understand the Muslim stance on Jesus. The Bible indicates that Jesus is Lord, Jesus preformed many miracles, Jesus is God, Jesus died on the cross to save the world, Jesus is the Messiah, etc.. Jesus is mentioned in the Qur'an, and I have never heard a rejection from Muslims of Jesus' teachings. I am wondering, do Muslims believe that Jesus lied when he said (John 14:6) "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me."? Or do Muslims believe Jesus was telling the Truth?

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